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Imagines Opera Pompei

An Image database for Pompey the Great and his Monuments

We highly recommend IrfanView, a freeware viewer if you wish to save and download any pics here or elsewhere.  IrfanView is simply the best image viewer available.


All images have been divided into the following categories for your viewing convenience:

Numismatic Portraits and Evidence:  An archive of all Roman coinage pertaining to Cn. Pompeius Magnus and his two sons, Gnaeus and Sextus.

Sculpture:  This gallery contains images of the surviving portraits of Pompey.  Also included are sculptures associated with his theater complex.

Sketches and Models of the Opera Theatri Pompei:  The earliest sketches in this gallery date back to the 17th century.  The models are modern--mid-20th century.  It should be pointed out that these reconstructions are based more on imagination than a study of the archaelogical remains.  The only ancient evidence consulted, if any, will have been the fragments and sketches of the Forma Urbis Romae, for which see the following gallery.

Plans of the Opera Theatri Pompei:  An ancient marble plan of the theater of Pompey survives in fragments.  Happily a Renaissance-era sketch preserves the lost pieces.  We have also included modern maps and plans of the theater complex.  Maps of the Campus Martius are included in this section.

The Theater of Pompey in Maps of Ancient Rome:  This gallery comprises details of maps of ancient Rome, all of which were drawn between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries.  These maps are important for their place in the history of topographical studies of ancient Rome.  Unlike the following gallery, these maps are hypothetical reconstructions.

The Theater of Pompey and the Rise of Modern Rome:  This gallery contains cartographic surveys of the region surrounding the Theater of Pompey.  The details from these rarely seens maps of Rome trace the transformation of the neighborhood that rests on top of theater of Pompey.  They date from the fiteenth to late twentieth century.

Remains of the Theater of Pompey I:  While most of the exterior of the theater of Pompey has vanished, along with the porticus and curia, archaeological remains are still very much extant.  Much of the substructure survives in the neighborhood of the Campo dei Fiori.  The vaults of the cavea have been built over and into the basements of many buildings along the Via di Grotta Pinta.  Currently there is a theater (obviously much smaller) and a restaurant, among other establishments, that incorporate the substructure of the Theater of Pompey into their environs.  Serious excavation is impossible due to the aforementioned buildings, many of which date back to the 16th century.

Remains of the Theater of Pompey II:  Images of still extant vaults and architectural elements of the theater of Pompey.  An Exclusive Archive of the T.P.P.

Remains of the Theater of Pompey III:  More images of buildings in the neighborhood of the Campo dei Fiori that preserve the curve of the theater's cavea, as well as images of columns from the Piazza della Cancelleria, which originally stood outside the theater.

Remains of the Theater of Pompey IV:  Walk along the Via di Grotta Pinta and trace the outline of the theater.

Canina:  The complete set of illustrations (plates CLIII-CLVIII) on the theater from Luigi Canina's monumental Gli Edifizj di Roma Antica e sua Campagna vol. 4, published in Rome in 1851.

Slide Show:  High Speed Connection Highly Recommended.  Opens in a new window.  Images will automatically rotate, or if you wish to proceed, simply click anywhere on the image.


If you are the copyright holder of any image which has erroneously appeared without your permission, please let us know the precise url under which the full-size image appears.  We would be happy to assign proper credits or remove it.  Many images have been donated to this site in the past.  It has come to my attention that a very few of them in one case were perhaps not from the true owner.  All images added in the last couple of years are verified, but I lack records to validate some of the (lo res) images which have been on this site for the last 3-5 years.

The Theatrum Pompei Project does NOT claim ownership of any image which appears on this site, including all of our own original art, images, and photos as well as our personal scans of public domain material.  All original images and scans which have been posted on this site are declared to be in the public domain.  We are updating such images to display with an alt text of TPP PDD—Theatrum Pompei Project Public Domain Document—as an indicator.  It is our desire to share freely this type of visual information instead of coveting our own reproductions of artefacts which are likely a couple of thousand years old.  Pompey put it eloquently himself:  "Sharing is necessary, hoarding is not."  Well, maybe Pompey didn't say quite that, but he did spare and even liberate many captives during the Pirate War (—the Desert Storm of antiquity), so we fancy that his was a generous nature, much more so than that tyrannical and overrated clementia of Jules.
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