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This links page was posted on 17 March 2005 and last revised in November 2009.  Suggestions are welcome!  Our goal is to be comprehensive in only one area:  (1) Pompey's contributions to Roman architecture, building, and sculpture.  For links to representations of Pompey in art, they are carried in the relevant galleries of Imagines.  For other areas we try to refer only to the best sites, most of which will themselves carry comprehensive links for their respective area of speciality.  We do focus on sites which provide significant chunks of reading material in a “read-friendly” format.  Site descriptions in quotes are taken verbatim from the respective site's meta-description or main page.

 

Quick Index
Excavations and Reconstructions of the Theater of Pompey
Other Useful Sites for Researching the Theater of Pompey
Classical Languages and Literature
Ancient History
Paragons of Pedagogy on the Web


Excavations and Reconstructions of the Theater of Pompey


The Pompey Project - King's Visualization Lab:  A concise, well-written overview of the theater of Pompey.  Summaries of the ongoing excavations are also provided.

Pompey Project

Packer, James E.  Rethinking Pompey's Theater: The Pompey Project, Documentation and Excavation (1996 - 2003): Offline.

Barnes, Cynthia. “Recreating Pompey for Modern Eyes.” Humanities:  July 2004

   

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Other Useful Sites for Researching the Theater of Pompey


Stanford Digital Forma Urbis Romae Project

 

Home page for Stanford Digital Forma Urbis Romae Project

Quick Links for the Theater of Pompey and Related Monuments

(All links open in a new and offsite window.)

Porticus Pompeianae 1, 2, 3
Theatrum Pompei
Theatrum Pompei - Renaissance drawings of the pieces of the Forma Urbis Romae

 

Theater of Pompey at Wikipedia

 

Theater of Pompey at Models of Rome

 

POMPEY'S POLITICS AND THE PRESENTATION OF HIS THEATRE-TEMPLE COMPLEX, 6152 BCE:  An article by Mark Temelini.

 

Vedute di Roma:  Purdy pictures of Kalervo Koskimies.  No, not of Mr. Koskimies, but of Roma.  No, I don't mean to insinuate that Mr. Koskimies is not purdy.  :)-

 

Aquae Urbis Romae:  “The Waters of the City of Rome is a cartographic history of 2800 years of water infrastructure and urban development in Rome. Water is a living system that includes natural features (springs, the Tiber River, etc.) and hydraulic elements (aqueducts, bridges, fountains, etc.) that are linked through topography. Learn about the structure, methodology, and pedagogical goals of the project.” 

A fascinating piece of collaborative scholarship.  The relevance to the theater of Pompey emerges from questions into how the Porticus Pompei was probably supplied with running water.

 

   

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Classical Languages and Literature


Attalus:  “This site contains detailed lists of events and sources for the history of the Hellenistic world and the Roman republic. It includes links to online translations of many of the sources, as well as new translations of some works which have not previously been easily available in English.”

The Library of Ancient Texts Online:  “The internet's most thorough catalogue of online copies of ancient Greek texts, both in Greek and in translation. No texts are actually hosted on this site. Links in LATO are organised by author, or, where authorship is uncertain, by the titles of texts.”

Perseus Digital Library:  “Includes tests [sic] from the classical and renaissance world.”  I make lots of typos myssself, but I don't make grammatical mistakes, so their. ;)

The Latin Library:  Self-explanatory :)

ELPENOR:  “ELPENOR is built around a Bilingual Anthology of all periods of Greek literature, including downloadable versions of Plato, Aristotle, Physis Library, and the New Testament.”

   

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Ancient History


Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik [Journal for Papyrology and Epigraphy]:  Articles from 1990-2000 are available for free download in pdf format.  Articles are text-based, so the files are small in size and searchable.  Articles from 2001-2003 are available here for a price.

eScholarship:  “The eScholarship Editions collection includes more than 1,400 books from academic presses on a range of topics, including art, science, history, music, religion, and fiction.  Access to the electronic books is open to all University of California faculty, staff, and students, while select books are available to the public.  Print versions of many of the electronic books can be purchased directly from the publishers.”  [Back to Top]


Paragons of Pedagogy on the Web


Textkit:  “Textkit is the Internet's largest provider of free and fully downloadable Greek and Latin grammars and readers.  With currently 146 free books to choose from, Greek and Latin learners have downloaded 636,801 grammars, readers and classical e-books.”

Maps for Students:  “Cooperating with faculty at UNC-CH, and with the scholars who commission custom maps from the AWMC for their publications, we are developing a collection of free digital maps for educational use.  This effort gives teachers and students an expanding set of small-scale reference maps for classroom and personal use.  Each may be downloaded from the website in multiple formats.  A blank version of each map –suitable for map quizzes and customization–is usually available.”

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