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Licinius Calvus, C.  (Return to List) (Previous Poet)


All translations are © 1999-2000 by Ulysses K. Vestal.



Curius (FLP 201.1; Ascon. In Toga Candida St. 72)


Curius hic notissimus fuit aleator damnatusque postea est. In hunc est hendecasyllabus Calvi elegans:


et talis Curius pereruditus.



This Curius was a very notorious gambler and afterwards he was condemned. Against him there is Calvus' choice line of hendecasyllabics:


and Curius, such a remarkably learned man.




Country Life (FLP 202.2; Gell. 9.12.10)


C. Calvus in poematis laboriosus dicit non, ut vulgo dicitur, qui laborat, sed in quo laboratur.


durum rus fugit et laboriosum.



In a poem Gaius Calvus means "toilsome," not, as it is commonly meant, as he who toils, but [as something] in which there is toil.


The country shuns what is harsh and toilsome.




Tigellus (FLP 202.3; Porphyrio ad Hor. Serm. 1.3.1)


de eodem Hermogene loquens Sardum dixit:


Sardi Tigelli putidum caput venit.



When speaking about this same Hermogenes he said Sardinian.


The foul person of Tigellius the Sardinian is for sale.




A Bride (FLP 203.4; Charis. 186B=147K)


"ungui" Licinius Calvus in poemate:


vaga candido
nympha quod secet ungui.



Licinius Calvus [wrote] "with a nail" in a poem:


Which the fickle bride
might cut with a white nail.




Venus the God (FLP 204.7; Serv. Aen. 2.632)


Utrisque sexus participationem habere numina; nam ait Calvus:


pollentemque deum Venerem.



The gods have a part of each sex; for Calvus says:


and the powerful god Venus.




Pedicator Caesaris (FLP 210.17; Suet. Iul. 49.1)


[Ommito Calvi Licini notissimos versus:]
Bithynia quicquid
et pedicator Caesaris umquam habuit.



[I omit the very well-known verses of Calvus Licinius:]
Whatever Bithynia
and the sodomite of Caesar ever possessed






An Epigram on Pompey (FLP 210.18; Schol. Juv. 9.133)


Magnus, quem metuunt omnes, digito caput uno
scalpit; quid credas hunc sibi velle? virum.


Magnus, whom everyone fears, scratches his head
with one finger; what do you think that this man wants for himself? A man.




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All Original Content Is Copyright © 1999-2007 by Ulysses K. Vestal

NO restrictions, however, exist on the use of original content.